Class Size Counts!

As educators and WEA members, we know there’s nothing more important than having the time to give all students the personal attention they need to succeed.

With nearly 40 students in some classes, South Kitsap teachers recently took a stand for smaller class sizes -- and won!

With nearly 40 students in some classes, South Kitsap teachers recently took a stand for smaller class sizes — and won!

Despite the research and our own experience, the Washington Legislature has failed to fund the small class sizes our students deserve. In fact, Washington’s class sizes are 47th in the nation — only three states have classrooms more crowded than ours! Here’s the chart that shows where Washington ranks on class size. Here’s a chart that compares Washington to Massachusetts — which has 90,000 fewer students but 15,000 more teachers!

Class Size Counts logoClass Size Counts is a community-based campaign to reduce class sizes in our state.

Class Size Counts materials you can print and share at WEA meetings:

Read, download and print the class-size research:

Benefits of smaller class sizes:

  • More individualized attention for each student.
  • More student-teacher engagement.
  • Better test scores, particularly in primary grades.
  • Higher academic achievement for disadvantaged and low-income students.

Hold legislators to their promise:

Legislators promised in SHB 2776 to reduce class sizes to meet the recommendations of the Quality Education Council. By 2018, those recommendations call for:

  • Grades K-3: Class size of 17
  • Grades 4-12: Class size of 25

In schools with more than 50 percent of students receiving free or reduced lunches, the recommendations call for even lower class sizes:

  • Grades K-3: Class size of 15
  • Grade 4: Class size of 22
  • Grades 5-12: Class size of 25

The QEC recommendations also call for increasing the number of education support professionals in our public schools.